Christopher Boehm

Christopher Boehm is the Director of the Jane Goodall Research Center and a Professor of Anthropology and Biological Sciences at the University of Southern California. His field work with Navajos, Montenegrin Serbs, and wild chimpanzees has focused on questions of morality and evolution. His current research centers on the evolution of the human conscience and on social selection as an agency for the development of altruistic behavior in humans. As Director of the Goodall Center, Dr. Boehm is creating a multi-media, interactive database focusing on the social and moral behavior of world hunter gatherers. He is the author of Hierarchy in the Forest: The Evolution of Egalitarian Behavior (1999), Blood Revenge: The Enactment and Management of Conflict in Montenegro and Other Tribal Societies (1986), and Montenegrin Social Organization and Values: Political Ethnography of a Refuge Area Tribal Adaptation (1983). He has won the Stirling Prize in Psychological Anthropology, and has been the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and a fellowship at the School of Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
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Frans B. M. de Waal

Frans B. M. de Waal is the C. H. Candler Professor of Primate Behavior and Director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences. In 2007, Time selected him as one of the World's 100 Most Influential People for his work looking at animal characteristics shared by humans including reciprocity, empathy, and conflict resolution. He is the author of nine books, several of which discuss the evolutionary origin of human morality and the implications of what we know about bonobos for models of human social evolution. Titles include Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals (1996), Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape (1997), Our Inner Ape: A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are (2005), and most recently, The Age Of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society (2009).
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Celia Deane-Drummond

Celia Deane-Drummond is professor of theology and the biological sciences at the University of Chester, United Kingdom, and is director of the Centre for Religion and the Biosciences, established in 2002. She has degrees in natural science, plant physiology, theology, and education, and two doctoral degrees in plant physiology (1980) and theology (1992). Dr. Deane-Drummond has drawn on each of these interests in her contributions to the new discipline of “ecotheology” and in her research on bioethics, especially genetics, environmental ethics, and animal ethics. She has written more than fifty articles in scientific and scholarly journals and is the author or co-author of numerous other books, including, Creation Through Wisdom (2000), Biology and Theology Today: Exploring the Boundaries (2001), The Ethics of Nature (2004), Genetics and Christian Ethics (2006), and Wonder and Wisdom: Conversations in Science, Spirituality and Theology (2006), Christ and Evolution: Wonder and Wisdom (2009), and Creaturely Theology: On God, Humans and Other Animals (2009).
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Dean Falk

Dean Falk is Hale G. Smith Professor of Anthropology at Florida State University as well as a senior scholar at the School for Advanced Research. Her research centers on a variety of topics within paleoanthropology including Homo floresiensis, the application of medical imaging technology to studies of endocasts, evolution of brain and behavior in higher primates, neurological and behavioral substrates that preceded the evolution of protolanguage, and the origins of music and language. She has written extensively on these topics including more than 70 publications in refereed journals and a dozen books. Perhaps most well-known is the recently revised and expanded Braindance: New Discoveries about Human Origins and Brain Evolution (2003) which considers the evolutionary origins of the human brain. Dr. Falk’s most recent book, Finding Our Tongues: Mothers, Infants and the Origins of Language (2009) examines the role of infant-directed speech with natural selection for bipedalism as well as how language may have become conventionalized within populations.
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Daniel M. T. Fessler

Daniel M. T. Fessler is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles where he is also director of the Center for Behavior, Evolution, & Culture. His research interests include evolutionary psychology, biological anthropology, emotions, social control, ingestive and reproductive behaviors, and morality. He is the Co-Editor-in-Chief of Evolution & Human Behavior. Dr. Fessler has written extensively on a range of topics relevant to the evolution of conscience, including shame, competition and conformity, responses to transgression, self-esteem and risk taking, and emotional and cognitive elements of cooperation.
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Jessica Flack

Jessica Flack is a research professor at the Santa Fe Institute and co-director of the Construction Dynamics Group. Her research program combines selectionist, mechanistic, and computational perspectives with the aim of building a theory for the evolution and emergence of "hierarchically structured aggregates"— including organisms and societies—inthe history of life. A primary motivation is to determine how organisms (including humans) reduce uncertainty in their social and ecological environments by investing in control and other kinds of regulatory mechanisms that make the behavior of their competitors and social partners more predictable. Research foci include design principles for robust systems, conflict dynamics and prediction, the evolution of communication, social computation and collective behavior,analogs between recursion in language and recursion in social interactions, and the implications of this "social recursion" for societal complexity and innovation. Dr. Flack is also working on a theory for the emergence of power structures.
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John Hare

John Hare is the Noah Porter Professor of Philosophical Theology at Yale Divinity School. In 2008-2009, he was awarded a senior fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Notre Dame, where he also delivered the Annual Plantinga Lecture. He also delivered one of four 2005 Gifford Lectures at the University of Glasgow. Dr. Hare’s research interests extend to ancient philosophy, medieval Franciscan philosophy, Kant, Kierkegaard, contemporary ethical theology, the theory of the atonement, medical ethics, and international relations. His best known book is The Moral Gap (1996) in which he develops an account of the need for God’s help in meeting the moral demands of which God is the source. He has written five other books including Why Bother Being Good? (2002), and God and Morality: A Philosophical History (2007).
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Robert Hare

Robert Hare is an emeritus professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught and conducted research for some 35 years. He is also President of Darkstone Research Group Ltd., a forensic research and consulting firm. He has devoted most of his academic career to the investigation of psychopathy, its nature, assessment, and implications for mental health and criminal justice. He is the developer of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and author of several books and more than one hundred scientific articles on psychopathy. His titles include Without Consience: the Disturbing World of Psychopaths among Us (1998) and Snakes in Suits: When Psychopaths Go to Work (2006).
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Dominic Johnson

Dominic Johnson is a Reader in Politics & International Relations at the University of Edinburgh, and formerly held fellowships at Harvard, Stanford, and Princeton Universities. He received a D.Phil. from Oxford University in evolutionary biology, and a Ph.D. from Geneva University in political science. Drawing on both disciplines, he is interested in how new research on evolution, biology, and human nature is challenging theories of international relations, conflict, and cooperation. His most recent book, Failing to Win: Perceptions of Victory and Defeat in International Politics was named 2006 Best Book in International Studies by the International Studies Association. He is also the author of Overconfidence and War: The Havoc and Glory of Positive Illusions (2004). Dominic’s current work focuses on the role of evolutionary adaptation, evolutionary psychology, and religion in human conflict and cooperation. He is leading a three-year Templeton funded research project on "The Adaptive Logic of Religious Beliefs and Behaviour" (evolution-of-religion.com).
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Kent Kiehl

Kent Kiehl is an associate professor of Psychology at the University of New Mexico and the Director of Mobile Imaging Core and Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience at the Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery (MIND) Institute. His research focuses on the clinical neuroscience of major mental illnesses, especially criminal psychopathy, substance abuse, and psychotic disorders. Over the course of his research, he has produced a number of tests and software packages to aid research in the field. He recently edited a book on psychopathy and law and has published over 80 articles exploring the neuroscience of psychopathy and schizophrenia. His work also includes studies of the related phenomena of empathy, impulsivity, and inhibition.
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Robert J. Richards

Robert J. Richards is the Morris Fishbein Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Chicago. His research spans the breadth of the history and philosophy of psychology and biology with specific interests in evolutionary theory, biopsychology, ethology, and sociobiology. He is a corresponding member of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and was the 2005 Ryerson Memorial Lecturer at the University of Chicago as well as a recipient of a 2004-2005 Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. He has written several books on the impact of evolutionary theory including, The Tragic Sense of Life: Ernst Haeckel and the Struggle over Evolutionary Thought (2009); The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe (2002); The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological Reconstruction of Darwin’s Theory (1992); and Darwin and the Emergence of Evolutionary Theories of Mind and Behavior (1987). He is currently working on a historical and philosophical commentary on Darwin's Origin of Species.
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Jeffrey Schloss

Jeffrey Schloss is Distinguished Professor and T. B. Walker Chair of Biology at Westmont College. He has been a Danforth Fellow, a Crosson Fellow at the University of Notre Dame Center for Philosophy of Religion, a Plummer Fellow at St. Anne’s College, Oxford, and Senior Fellow at the Emory University Center for Law and Religion. His interests include evolutionary accounts of altruism, morality, and religious cognition as well as their philosophical and theological implications. Recent collaborative projects include Altruism and Altruistic Love: Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue (2002), Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspectives (2004), and The Believing Primate: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives on the Origin of Religion (2009). He currently works on the role of oxytocin in mediating religious signaling and prosociality.
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Jonathan H. Turner

Jonathan H. Turner is a distinguished professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has been the president of the Pacific Sociological Association and the California Sociological Association. Dr. Turner has been a visiting professor at Cambridge University, Universitat Bremen, Universitat Bielefeld, Shandong University, and Nan Kai University. His research interests include the sociology of emotions, ethnic relations, social institutions, social stratification, and bio-sociology. He has authored or coauthored 33 books including, The Sociology of Emotions (2005) and On the Origins of Human Emotions (2000), as well as a number of works on social interaction such as Face-to-Face: Toward a Sociological Theory of Interpersonal Behavior (2002), A Theory of Social Interaction, (1988), and Incest: Origins of the Taboo (2005). He has also written on social institutions and their evolution in Human Institutions: A Theory of Societal Evolution (2004), The Institutional Order (1997), and Macrodynamics: Toward a Theory of the Organization of Human Populations (1995). Relative to the conference, he has co-authored with Alexandra Maryanski three books on the evolution of humans and the consequences of human nature for patterns of human interaction and social organization: The Social Cage: Human Nature and the Evolution of Society (1992), Incest: On The Origins of the Taboo (2005), and On The Origin of Societies by Natural Selection (2008).
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Paul Wason

Paul Wason is director of life sciences for the John Templeton Foundation. He works with scientists, theologians, philosophers and ministers on programs that feature the constructive engagement of the life sciences and studies of human nature with philosophy and religion. Dr. Wason is an anthropologist (Ph.D., Stony Brook University) with a specialty in prehistoric archaeology. His research on inequality, social evolution and archaeological theory has been published as The Archaeology of Rank (Cambridge, 1994) and in other works, and he is currently studying the changing relations between religion, status, and leadership throughout history, but especially in the European Neolithic. He is also interested in cultural evolution, especially questions of meaning and purpose in the living world and the world of human affairs.
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Polly Wiessner

Polly Wiessner is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Utah where she was recently awarded the school’s Distinguished Scholarly and Creative Research Award. She worked at the Max Planck Institute’s research group for Human Ethology in Andechs, Germany, from 1981- 1998 and has been a visiting professor at the University of Aarhus and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes. Dr. Wiessner has conducted fieldwork among the !Kung Bushmen foragers for 35 years, focusing on social security systems of sharing and exchange. Her second fieldsite is among the Enga of Papua New Guinea where she has conducted 25 years of ethnohistorical and ethnographic research on exchange, ritual, and warfare with an emphasis on cooperation and competition. She is currently looking at changes in warfare after the breakdown of many Enga traditions that contained war and the replacement of bows and arrows with high-powered weapons. She has also conducted research on the impact of warfare on children’s moral evaluations. Dr. Wiessner has authored, co-authored or edited four books, Historical Vines: Enga Networks of Exchange, Ritual, and Warfare in Papua New Guinea (1998), Food and the Status Quest (1996), From Inside the Women’s House: the lives and traditions of Enga women (1992), and A View of Enga Culture (1989).
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